Archives for December 14, 2017

Data integration is one thing the cloud makes worse

One, enterprises have too many decisions to make. Two, it’s difficult to find success with complex data integration. Those are the two main excuses I hear these days, as enterprises move to the cloud. Whatever the justification, the lack of attention to data integration is beginning to cause some real damage. 

So, what went wrong? Enterprises have so much coming at them that they don’t think about every approach and technology that they need to think about. Security, management, monitoring, and governance are getting the attention they need, but data integration has fallen off the radar screen.

A byproduct of this behavior? More data silos. We all know that data silos are bad, but we seem to be building more data silos—not only on premises but in the public cloud. 

Data silos by themselves are not bad if they are integrated with other data silos. This means that as one silo is updated, the other silos are aware of the update and can immediately exchange information. 

The idea is that you need a “single source of truth” for data, using an old Oracle phrase. A single record of a customer, inventory, sales, or other information you want to track. 

But without a data integration strategy and technology, a single source of data truth is not possible. Systems become islands of automation unto themselves, and it doesn’t matter if they are in the public cloud or not.

The cloud makes many things better, but it makes data integration worse. Indeed, as you migrate applications and data to the cloud, as well as build new applications and databases, chances are you’re forgetting about data integration. 

The result is a far-diminished value of the systems you use, because the data is redundant and out of sync. Enterprise IT should treat data as a single consistent resource that can span all systems and platforms, both cloud and noncloud. If you overlook this aspect, you won’t find the business value you’re seeking. 

Alphabet's X sells new wireless internet tech to Indian state

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s X research division said on Thursday that India’s Andhra Pradesh state government would buy its newly developed technology that has the potential to provide high-speed wireless internet to millions of people without laying cable.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but the agreement, which begins next year, would see 2,000 boxes installed as far as 20 kilometers (12 miles) apart on posts and roofs to bring a fast internet connection to populated areas. The idea is to create a new backbone to supply service to cellphone towers and Wi-Fi hotspots, endpoints that users would then access.

The agreement is an outgrowth of X’s Project Loon, which on several occasions has beamed cellphone service to Earth from a network of large balloons. The balloons link directly to smartphones but are meant for rural areas with a low population density, according to X.

Alphabet, which owns Google, and other online service providers view increasing internet accessibility in developing countries as crucial to maintaining their fast-growing businesses.

Andhra Pradesh, a southeastern coastal state with 53 million people, had nearly 15 million high-speed internet subscribers as of last December, according to a report by India’s telecom regulator. The state wants to connect an additional 12 million households by 2019, Alphabet said.

X plans to deploy free space optical technology, which transmits data through light beams at up to 20 gigabits per second between the rooftop boxes. There would be enough bandwidth for thousands of people to browse the Web simultaneously through the same cellphone tower, X said.

Researchers have said such systems hold promise in areas where linking cellphone towers to a wired connection is expensive and difficult. But the technology has not taken off because poor weather or misalignment between the boxes can weaken the connection.

Baris Erkmen, who is leading the effort inside X, said his team is “piloting a new approach” to overcome the challenges, but he did not specify the software and hardware advancements.

X plans to have a small team based in Andhra Pradesh next year to help roll out the technology.

Reporting by Paresh Dave, Editing by Rosalba O’Brien