35-Year-Old Teen Casey Neistat Says a Few Stupid Things

After creating a pointless app no one used and then selling it (and himself) to CNN for a reported $ 25 million, vlogger-to-the-stars and sentient pair of distressed Ray-Bans Casey Neistat became the poster boy for failing upward.

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Netflix’s New Series Dark Looks Like the Scarier German Version of Stranger Things

“A missing child sets four families on a frantic hunt for answers. Their search for a culprit unearths a small town’s sins and secrets.” No, it’s not the description of Stranger Things. It’s actually the plot of a new Netflix original series called Dark and while the two sound very similar, but that’s where the…

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Burstorm Chairman, Dr. Timothy Chou, Talks "Cloud Computing" and "Internet of Things (IoT)" on …

Burstorm is pleased to announce that Dr. Timothy Chou, Chairman of the Board and renowned cloud computing lecturer and author of recently …


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The Garage All Four Wheels Fall Off Immediately After Jiffy Lube Brake Job | Lifehacker Eight Things

The Garage All Four Wheels Fall Off Immediately After Jiffy Lube Brake Job | Lifehacker Eight Things You Probably Didn’t Know You Could Stream On Spotify | io9 Why Roland Emmerich Had to Wait 20 Years to Finally Make Independence Day: Resurgence | Kotaku DOOM’s Approach To Collectibles Is Smart, Fun, And Satisfying |

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5 things you should know about blockchains

Talk of blockchain technology is everywhere, it seems — but what is it, and what does it do?

1. Don’t call it “the” blockchain

The first thing to know about the blockchain is, there isn’t one: there are many. Blockchains are distributed, tamper-proof public ledgers of transactions. The most well-known is the record of bitcoin transactions, but in addition to tracking cryptocurrencies, blockchains are being used to record loans, stock transfers, contracts, healthcare data, and even votes.

2. Security, transparency: the network’s run by us

There’s no central authority in a blockchain system: Participating computers exchange transactions for inclusion in the ledger they share over a peer-to-peer network. Each node in the chain keeps a copy of the ledger, and can trust others’ copies of it because of the way they are signed. Periodically, they wrap up the latest transactions in a new block of data to be added to the chain. Alongside the transaction data, each block contains a computational “hash” of itself and of the previous block in the chain.

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Gmail, SMTP, DNS and more: Four things I broke first, fixed later

Http requests aren’t limited to just browser-to-host, though. Many hosts talk over http to other hosts. This is the fundamental architecture that allows us to have a mashable Web, with XML and REST and JSON requests shooting back and forth between


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